How To Create New Year’s Resolutions That Will Stick

No doubt you are all excited for 2021, and the fresh start it promises for all of us. The pandemic will not miraculously go away – but I am certainly wishing for a better year for the world. Along with any new year comes the exciting notion of resolutions! I will be setting a few myself. This is how I chose what goals to pursue. With the technique I am going to share in this post, hopefully you will find yourself more compelled to achieve your resolutions! Because, no matter how motivational, a Pinterest quote doesn’t solve everything…

The words: who, what, where, when, why, how will not be unfamiliar to you. In fact they might even bring back haunting memories of primary school English class (if you know, you know). Let’s take that academic connotation away and turn them into tools for success! (stick with me – this is going somewhere)

What

You must first determine your what. What do you want to achieve? From as small as baking a 3 tier cake, to creating a consistent meditation habit. Have in your mind what you want to achieve. Write it down if it helps! Don’t feel any of your goals are insignificant. Make a list of everything – big and small – you wish to do. We’ll narrow it down later.

You’ll be glad to see that I’m using a different candle in this post 😂

How

How will you complete your ‘what’? For each part of your ‘what’ list, write down a set of instructions or steps for success. My resolution is consistent journaling (very atypical). I will achieve it by opening my journal, picking up a pen and writing every day. 

It may be stupidly obvious! Yet breaking the task up will allow it to appeal to the brain more.

My January bullet journal set-up

Where

Might sounds a little ridiculous but it will help as the year goes along (also as the New Year’s buzz fades away). Where are you going to complete your goal? Again with my journaling example: I am going to journal in my bed. For exercising consistently – it might be a run around the canal every morning. Find your where. This is a bit like the previous step: it is breaking down your big goal into ‘digestible’ chunks. Also, the more boxes checked off the more accomplished you’ll feel!

‘No matter how motivational, a Pinterest quote doesn’t solve everything…’

When

I find the ‘when’ is the most useful (besides the why). Finding a when will allow the habit/goal to thread into your daily routine. Make time for your goals! Determining a ‘when’ means there will be less friction between you and achieving the goal. Throughout the year it will create consistency. If you’ve not heard it before (possibly one of the most important quotes of all time): consistency is key!

The mistletoe come twig doodle is starting to grow on me

Why

This is where we narrow down which goals are the most important to you. That list you created earlier? We need it again. For everything on your list think – or write down – a why. The ones you are most passionate about will have the most ‘why’. But don’t let this fool you! You can have perfectly valid goals that don’t need a why.

The process of writing the ‘why’ is very meditative. Between words your mind is getting more and more excited for the prospect of completing this final goal. The ‘why’ is also nice to read back on when you are losing motivation with your goal. At the start of the year you put a lot of thought into what you wanted to pursue.

I have a tiny calendar this month because I tend not to use the bigger ones

If you have been a reader of my blog for a while now, you will know of my fixation on writing to-do lists the night before. I think this is the best way for me personally because…

  1. The night before your mind is more alive, and it knows what is best for you. It knows what is needed to have a good following day. But say for example you wrote your list in the morning – your priorities wouldn’t be the same. You might be working for your own short-term comfort rather than long-term bliss.
  2. I believe this aligns with setting goals at the start of the year – but throughout the year losing motivation with them. Just because you are losing motivation with them doesn’t mean you should give up. Because past you (or ‘more awake’ you) probably knows what’s best. We do grow from our past – of course – but in this instance the past self is the more motivated self.
  3. But although it is important to remind yourself of why you initiated this goal in the first place, things do change. Don’t tie yourself down to a resolution if it isn’t benefiting you anymore.

I really hope this tips help you to consolidate what resolutions you wish to pursue and how you will get there. Hope to see you again on Friday where I will share my New Year’s Resolutions with you all. As a Slytherin, I have certainly been ambitious. But no doubt I will get there 🙂

What are your New Year’s resolutions/goals?

Thank you for reading and I wish you a very happy new year!

Catherine x 

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18 thoughts on “How To Create New Year’s Resolutions That Will Stick

  1. Pingback: Choose a New Year’s focus instead of a New Year’s resolution – Business Rules for Life

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